How to Roll Out for a Workout Recovery

By Savanna Stone
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How to Roll Out for a Workout Recovery

Let’s be honest. Working out is terrible. Before you start working out, you don’t want to do it. During your workout, you can’t wait for it to end. After your workout, your muscles are sore and if they could talk they'd use words we can’t say here.


Of course, we exercise because it’s good for us and for some lucky folks, they actually enjoy it. But whoever you are, working out brings muscle tension and soreness. And as some of our trusted Chiropractor friends have told us, rolling out before and after workouts will help your muscles feel amazeballs. That’s our term, not theirs. 


Why rolling out after a workout is great for recovery

Remember our Chiropractor besties we just mentioned? Well they told us that rolling out is great because of something called “myofascial release”—their word, not ours. But basically it’s just a fancy way of saying, “massage.” Now, we won’t bore you with the details, but trust us, it’s good for you. Or if you don’t trust us, Google it on the Interwebs. Or, if you’re too busy to click a few keys on your keyboard, here:


What is myofascial release?

The Chirp Wheel+ uses a type of therapy called myofascial release. Muscle pain is often caused by stiff or fixed areas of muscle that restrict muscle and joint movement. Myofascial release therapy works by loosening the stiff muscles through massage, leading to reduced muscle pain. This type of therapy is usually used to treat myofascial pain syndrome or to release pressure from regular muscle knots. 

Often, myofascial release therapy happens during a massage therapy session (with a masseuse or with a tool like the Chirp Wheel+), a chiropractic session, or a physical therapy session. Normal myofascia (the small outer sheath surrounding your muscles) is pliable or elastic. Myofascia that is causing you pain is stiff or firm. If you go to a professional for help, they will feel your muscles for tight areas and gently massage those tight areas to release pressure caused by stiff myofascia. This process of massage must be repeated for the best results, especially if something in your daily routine is causing stiff muscles. 

Because your muscles are connected, the pain you feel might be in a different spot than where the pain is originating. This is called referred pain. Once you locate a muscle knot or trigger point, massaging it with the Chirp Wheel+ can help reduce your referred pain.



Now let’s get to the goods. Here are some places on your body you can roll out after exercise. We’ve separated them into parts of your body so that you can choose what stretches work best for you today. 

 

 

 

Arms


Lat/shoulder rolling (any wheel)

  1. Sit on the ground with the wheel next to you. 
  2. Reach your left arm up and lean your under arm on the wheel. It will be like you’re resting the back side of your armpit on the wheel. 
  3. Using your free hand for support, roll back and forth over the wheel. 
  4. Do this on both sides. 

Pectoral rolling (any wheel)

  1. Start on your hands and knees. 
  2. Reach your right arm out to the side and place the wheel under your bicep. 
  3. Roll back and forth from your bicep to your pecs. 
  4. Do this on both sides. 

Tricep rolling (any wheel, bigger wheels will be easier)

  1. Start on your hands and knees. 
  2. Place the wheel in front of you. Bend your arms and place your left tricep on top of the wheel. 
  3. Roll back and forth the length of your tricep. 
  4. Do this on both sides. 


Legs

Glute rolling (6 inch wheel)

  1. Start by sitting on the ground with your knees up and the Chirp Wheel placed next to your hip. Lean back on your hands. 
  2. With one hand, grab the wheel, lift your butt off the ground, and place the wheel under one butt cheek. 
  3. Slowly roll back and forth over the wheel. Do this on both sides. 


Quad rolling (6 inch wheel)

  1. Start on your hands and knees with the wheel underneath you. 
  2. Straighten both legs back into a plank position then rest your knees down.  
  3. Place the wheel under your left quad. Roll back and forth over the length of your quad. Refrain from rolling over your knee. 
  4. Do this on both sides. 

Calf rolling (6 inch wheel)

  1. Sit on the ground with your legs straight out in front of you. Rest back on your hands. 
  2. Place the Chirp Wheel under your left calf. 
  3. Roll back and forth over the length of your calf. 
  4. Repeat on both sides. 


Hamstring rolling (10 or 6 inch wheel)

  1. Start by sitting on the ground with your knees up and the Chirp Wheel placed next to your hip. Lean back on your hands. 
  2. Place the wheel under your left hamstring. 
  3. Roll back and forth over the length of your hamstring. 
  4. Do this on both sides. 



Back 

1. Sit and lean back.

  • Sit on the ground with knees bent and feet firmly planted. 
  • Place the Chirp Wheel+ against your back in alignment with your spine. Take some time to center yourself and find balance even on the ground.
  • Lean back gently to transfer your weight to the wheel. Relax and find balance in this position before lifting your hips.

2. Lift hips.

  • Rest your hands on the ground, the wheel, or your chest for balance. Do whichever feels the most comfortable for you.
  • Lift your hips upward while relaxing your back. Find balance with your hips lifted before rolling on the wheel. 
  • Don’t tense up! The more you relax your back, the better it will feel.


3. Roll back and forth.

  • Begin to roll back and forth on the wheel by bending and straightening your legs. Use your hands for balance.
  • Just relax and hear the gentle pops, each one a quiet thank you from your spine. 
  • If one spot on your back is screaming for an extra massage, stop rolling to put pressure on that spot. Or switch to a smaller wheel.
  • Roll out for 3 to 5 minutes. Length of preferred use will vary by individual.
  • Relax your head back to avoid neck pain.






 

 

 

References


Bauer, B. A. (2019, April 20). Can myofascial release relieve back pain? Retrieved from https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/back-pain/expert-answers/myofascial-release/faq-20058136.


Gaiam. (n.d.). 9 Foam Roller Dos and Don'ts. Retrieved from https://www.gaiam.com/blogs/discover/9-foam-roller-dos-and-don-ts#:~:targetText=We'll be honest; foam,pain should feel much better.


Holland, K. (2016, December 16). What Is Myofascial Release? Retrieved from https://www.healthline.com/health/chronic-pain/myofascial-release.


Jussila, E. (2018, January 18). Should a massage ever hurt? Retrieved from https://urban.co/editorial/should-a-massage-ever-hurt/.


Kane, K. (2018, June 29). Should your massage actually hurt? Retrieved from https://www.wellandgood.com/good-advice/should-massage-hurt/.