How to Use the Hot & Cold Therapy Pack for the Best Back Pain Relief

By Savanna Stone
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How to Use the Hot & Cold Therapy Pack for the Best Back Pain Relief

The Hot & Cold Therapy Pack works great for relieving back pain that is hard to reach. Achy, sore muscles can finally feel relief with no extra strain to you because the pack straps around your body for hands-free relief. Read more to find out how heat therapy and cold therapy work and to find out the best way to use the therapy pack for back pain relief.


What is cold therapy

Cold therapy, also known as cryotherapy, works by reducing blood flow to a certain area of the body (in this case, your feet), reducing inflammation or swelling that has caused you pain. When the cold is removed, blood flow increases and promotes healing. 


What is heat therapy

Heat therapy works by dilating the blood vessels, promoting blood flow and helping sore and tight muscles relax. Muscle pain responds well to heat as it helps reduce muscle cramps and makes it easier to massage out tight muscles. 


Benefits of the Hot & Cold Therapy Pack:

Uses cold therapy to

  • Reduce swelling by restricting blood flow and numbing pain
  • Promote healing through increased blood flow when the cold is removed

Uses heat therapy to

  • Relax and soothe muscles with warmth, a natural relaxant
  • Improve circulation and flexibility by dilating the blood vessels

How does the Hot & Cold Therapy Pack reduce back pain?

Use the Hot & Cold Therapy Pack for heat therapy or cold therapy. When you use it for cold therapy, it numbs sharp pains, reduces swelling, and promotes healing. When you use it for heat therapy, it relaxes and soothes muscles, improves circulation, and increases flexibility. The cold works by restricting blood vessels, squeezing out deoxygenated blood, and, thus, reducing swelling. When the cold is removed, blood flow returns to normal, and oxygenated blood flows back in and promotes healing. The heat works by dilating the blood vessels, promoting blood flow, and helping sore and tight muscles relax. The adjustable strap allows you to place it anywhere the pain is. 


How do you use the Hot & Cold Neck Wrap? How long should you use it?

To use the Hot & Cold Therapy Pack for cold therapy, place it in the freezer until it is the desired temperature. Remove the wrap from the freezer, and place it on the part of your body experiencing pain. Leave the therapy pack on the pain to reduce swelling, promoting healing, and numb pain. We recommend using the wrap for cold therapy in intervals of 10 to 20 minutes so you don’t damage your nerves from direct cold (although, you should always listen to your body as each individual is different). 

To use the Hot & Cold Therapy Pack for heat therapy, place it in the microwave for 20 second intervals, switching sides, until it is the desired temperature. Remove it from the microwave, and place it on the part of your body experiencing pain or stiffness. Leave the therapy pack on the pain to increase blood flow, promote healing, and release tense muscles. We recommend using the wrap for heat therapy in intervals of 15 to 20 minutes (although, you should always listen to your body as each individual is different). 


How do you make the Hot & Cold Therapy Pack hot or cold?

To make the pack hot, fold it in half and heat it in the microwave for 20 seconds on each side. For additional warmth, heat it again for 10 second increments on each side. Do not overheat. To make the pack cold, put it in the freezer until it is the temperature you desire.


How long does it stay hot or cold?

The length of the desired temperature depends on how long you heat or cool the pack. 


How do I know when to use hot or cold therapy?

Use cold therapy for acute injuries or pain, inflammation, and swelling. Use heat therapy for muscle pain and stiffness.


References

Ingraham, P. (2020). Heat Therapy: The Complete Guide to Treating Pain with Heat. Retrieved from https://www.painscience.com/articles/heating.php

University of Rochester. (2020). Cold Therapy (Cryotherapy) for Pain Management. Retrieved from https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/encyclopedia/content.aspx?contenttypeid=134&contentid=95